Resources

Can I grow carnivorous plants?

Lots of people want to grow carnivorous plants, but don't because they think these plants are too hard. When most of us think about carnivorous plants we think of plants which are difficult to grow outside of greenhouses, plants which need constant tropic like conditions and are so fragile they need to be contained in plastic domes for their own protection. Chances are you've already had a carnivorous plant that didn't make it too, further perpetuating the myth these plants are hard to grow. In reality, most carnivorous plants are hardy perennial plants which readily lend themselves to growing exceptionally well outside, in places like Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and Canberra to name a few. There are of course tropical ...
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My plants have arrived. What now?

Please rest assured we securely package your plants in moist Sphagnum moss, protected from heat, cold, dehydration and damage. Our plants can survive the post for at least two weeks. A regular question we get asked is, can the plants survive being posted bare rooted? The answer is overwhelmingly, yes. We have never lost plants in the mail. The information ...
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There are over a thousand species of carnivorous plants which have been identified by botanists, so to suggest their soil requirements can be lumped together would be naive and dangerous. However soils for carnivorous plants do often have things in common. What not to use Nothing with added fertilizers or soil conditions. These things will burn carnivorous plant roots and ...
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The only safe water for many carnivorous plants is clean rainwater, deionized water, reverse osmosis water or demineralised water. That is it. Nothing else. Not river water, not tap water, not holy water, not water you import from Switzerland. Certainly in Adelaide and other parts of South Australia the potable water is not suitable for carnivorous plants. Our advice is ...
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Before we begin I should mention the scientific name for a Venus Fly-Trap is Dionaea muscipula. You will come across this name if you pursue learning more about this plant. Venus Fly-Trap's and Dionaea muscipula are one and the same. 1.   Let there be light, aplenty Venus Fly-Traps need full sun. Actually it's fair to say the amount of shade ...
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Drosera root cuttings

Drosera root cuttings can yield mature plants within as little as one growing season. Root cuttings are the most effective ...
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A quick guide to buying high quality Venus Fly-Trap seeds without getting scammed.

I often see lots of Dionaea seed for sale on sites such as ebay, and I admit, I still slightly ...
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Are Venus Fly-Trap cultivars really all that different?

In summer you may find yourself out early one morning appreciating the new day while looking over your beautiful and ...
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Autumn fertilising

Fertilising your carnivorous plants in autumn is a great way to help next spring get off to a great start ...
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Bogs and carnivorous plants

Broadly speaking, a bog is a freshwater wetland of soft, spongy ground consisting mainly of partially decayed plant matter called ...
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Buyback program

It's the time of year when most people are dividing and re-potting their Venus Fly-Trap collection. As such, we thought ...
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